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This 16mm reel was produced by the Hearst Corporation and has the tone of a film that is very much of its time. You might think the working title was "Broads in Space? Whoda Thunk It!"
Clarifications: 0:00
1:04 - Valentina Tereshkova was NOT a barbie doll!
She was an experienced parachutist and became engineer - and extremely courageous, if that has to be pointed out. Also for the record, in the 1960's women were not permitted to be military jet pilots or test pilots, so the idea that this is the only legitimate pretext to being an astronaut is ridiculous.
2:38 - Really? What about the Mercury 13?
When the narrator states "for reasons that will forever remain unclear" is a falsehood. The truth is that when women pilots were tested for the Mercury program (the Mercury 13), and those chosen had passed all the same rigorous tests that the male pilots got (and outperformed them in many crucial tests) - but when presented with the findings it was vice president Lyndon Johnson who had sole authority over NASA operations, and his biased judgement prevented the Mercury 13 and indeed any other women from even being considered for American spaceflight... Until 1983. That is the real story.
https://www.space.com/mercury-13.html
4:40 - Only if you never look for them...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_women_aviators
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/flying-with-americas-most-famous-female-aviators-146485573/
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#NASA #Ride #Shuttle
- Intro Music by Fran Blanche -
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By Fran

5 thoughts on “America’s first women in space 1983”
  1. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars -Jeff- says:

    Sally Ride probably everyone knows, but Judith Resnik probably not so many. She was one of those we lost on the Challenger disaster.

  2. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars FREE MY GRANDMA!! says:

    Hi Francis ๐Ÿท๐Ÿท๐ŸŽ‰๐ŸŽ‰

  3. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Fred Knox says:

    Hmm. I don't doubt Emelia Earhart was brave. Flying over oceans in aircraft of the time was very risky. However, I do doubt her flying skills. That was mostly PR. She crashed a lot of planes. I would not recommend her for astronaut training.

    If you want a truly great female aviator, I suggest using Jacqueline (Jackie) Cochran instead. I would have no problem including her in the astronaut selection process.

  4. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars John Nelson says:

    Fran, I'm curious what was in the audio that had to be removed for copyright problems. Can you describe the material?

  5. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars BobC says:

    I became acquainted with Dr. Ride while she was a professor at UC San Diego, while I was the industry proctor/mentor for an externally funded undergraduate project to develop a swarm of small satellites. We'd nod and say "Hi" in the hallway, but the best moments were when she'd randomly pass by the project room and drop in for a few minutes. She treated the undergraduate team as peers, as fellow researchers. One of her projects involved science communication targeting children, and she would occasionally draft a team member for input and insight, as a collaborator.

    What an awesome person she was!

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