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This is my last build project before the move, it was half done when I got the notice that I was being pushed out of the space but I had to go back and finish it up and make this condensed video of the work. Worth it though, because this flight sim is the real deal! Enjoy!
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#Cessna #flight #simulator
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By Fran

15 thoughts on “Building A Flight Sim With Real Cessna 172 Controls!!!”
  1. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars GadgetUK164 - Retro Gaming Repairs & Mods says:

    Great job =D Lovely flying too!

  2. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Roy Oetting says:

    The construction part was excellent. Your knowledge of flying could be vastly improved if you went to a local airport and took a couple of lessons. For example when you climb out you are primarily looking for best rate of climb. The rate of climb is secondary. When you are on down wind in a light plane the distance from the the runway is the same as your altitude. Which is easily checked because the runway as you look down should be 45 degrees. You were way out there. This would be bad for two reasons , one, all planes in the pattern should be flying the same pattern for safety. the second reason is in the event of engine failure on downwind you should be able to glide to the runway. Any time you are making power changes you are more likely to have an engine problem. There is a sequence of events beginning on downwind where you start flying by airspeed and allow altitude to change. (starting at the abeam point) It is best you that you experience this in a real plane. You will love it. Nice video.

  3. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Taking Bytes says:

    Nice! I'm not quite sure why you'd use wood instead of metal, but hey, you built it for you not me! I'd love to see you make the whole dashboard!

  4. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Diego Cella says:

    Pretty cool job Fran! Make me want to go back to flightsim.

  5. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Thunderstruck54 says:

    That’s great thanks Fran for sharing that with us I used to fly with the old flight sim I need to upgrade

  6. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Thomas Donalek says:

    Hopefully someone will offer a good quality, but not wildly expensive, Cessna-style control option. Honeycomb would be ideal. In the mean time, this is a great project! There are some 3d printed options out there also. For full-on DIY, I've found MobiFlight on arduino to be pretty impressive.

  7. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars eima isack says:

    the dexterity and precison of an experienced fabricator mated with the feverishness of a child (it's a compliment, Fran)

  8. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars The Buffalo Estate says:

    Yay! Something more to watch while I draft! 🙂

  9. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Altijd Anders says:

    Some amazing tools you've got…!

  10. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Jack O'Neil says:

    Great Work Fran. I built a simulator room in my hanger using similar methods you did here and had hundred of hours of useful flying experiences with it. I've still got a 727 throttle quadrant that's got the throttles, reversers, trim STAB and flaps semi connected if anyone is interested.

  11. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars theelmonk says:

    I don't think I've seen you build mechanical stuff before – it's all been electronics. I'd like to see more – you've got some really good expertise and ideas.

  12. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Keri Szafir says:

    What a nice lil project, I like the way you dealt with levers. Bowden cables to the rescue! 🙂
    Fran-kly, I thought you were going for a realistic full cockpit build, but hey – these are hella expensive and take a loooooot of time to build.

  13. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars ElectricGears says:

    I really like that way of creating threads in wood. I have used a tip from Keith Appleton before about cutting the threads and then soaking them with thin CA glue to reinforce them. The paper towel does have the advantage of not risking splitting a small piece with the force of the tap, and you get threads all the way to the bottom of the hole.

  14. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Matt Wietlispach says:

    Excellent work Fran! There is nothing like the feel of the "real thing"! Very elegant mechanics to be sure. I don't work with general aviation avionics or private aircraft parts, but if you feel that you want to make a military simulator, or airliner cockpit simulator, using real parts, you know I'm there to help. From real throttle quadrants and controls to instrumentation and 400Hz power sources, no question you ask will be new to me. The materials and craftsmanship that goes into military aircraft and airliner parts have a "feel" that can't be replicated by plastic. I'm sure you'll work your way up to business jets and beyond. Keep it small and portable! Me and my other flight sim cronies went way off the rails when we bought the actual noses and flight decks from 737s to 747s. Luckily a ton of the "magical" mechanical interlinks in these cockpits are usually intact. But you can make your own, obviously. Reminds me of my humble beginnings. I had to interface the mechanics of a real A-10 throttle quadrant to potentiometers and there's many ways to do that. It's a very addictive hobby!

  15. Avataaar/Circle Created with python_avatars Alan Daters says:

    Great job of design and fabrication. I like the swing arm sandwich construction. I bet it "flies" much more realistically than the plastic quadrant!

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